Water Witch

She rolled them in and out around her fingers, rubbed them between her palms. Small like stones, but not stones.
Nearby the octopus pressed between the wire wall and the cage floor, oozed onto the first shelf then the second then the third. She set the shark teeth on the counter and lifted the creature.
“Sweet little thing,” she murmured at it.
“Sweet little thing,” she susurrated again, holding it against her almost the way she would hold a baby.
Unlike an actual baby, though, it went into the boiling cauldron. Not everyone could hear its death scream, but she knew the sound was there, echoing over the rocks to the water, enchanting the sea.
Next in were the shark teeth then bones from the toes of sailors and then tiny bits of barnacled hulls, gathered patiently after each shipwreck.
She gave the brew a thorough, final stir, raised her hands into the steam and repeated the words with exact intonations. She didn’t turn to the window to watch the results of the spell. She had done it enough times to be confident.
The lighthouse was disappearing. First the base. Then the tall tower. Finally, the light at the top was gone, too.
At least, gone for the ship careening toward shore. The fishing vessels, dinghies and row boats could all see the beacon just fine. Only the man of war was blind. Only the man of war would rip apart on the rocks.
When the fog lifted, and the lighthouse returned, she would be there first to replenish her stores. The villagers would come, hoping to save those who were still savable, but prepared to bury those who were not. As they turned the corner at the base cliff to get to the beach, she would call to them, “Hurry, this one’s alive.”
They’d run faster. They’d say, “Thank you, Sedna. Thank you for helping them.”
They never questioned the missing toes.

The Polite Commuter

I had a seat near the front of the bus. A good one – facing forward – and there was still one open in the sideways bench seats. I fished out my phone and started checking messages. The bus stopped again and an elderly couple got on. The man gave his wife the open seat, but he didn’t look too sturdy so I relinquished mine, walked to the open area by the back door and stood there. Almost fell when the bus jerked forward so I grabbed a pole then pulled out my phone again. The back of the bus was crowded enough that I had to move each time the drive open the rear door, but I was able to set backpack on the floor between my feet so that helped. I guess it wasn’t a big deal. I just couldn’t focus on my messages and ended up stuffing my phone in my backpack. A few stops later, the stop at the strip mall where the grocery store is, a woman got on with one of those double strollers with a toddler at the bottom and an infant on top. Plus she had half a dozen plastic grocery bags. The driver said they blocked too much of the aisle so she had to stand by the rear door with me. It was a squeeze. The carriage wheel pushed my bag so that I couldn’t reach it, but the mother said she wasn’t going far. When her stop came, the drop to the sidewalk was so steep that she couldn’t get the stroller off. I grabbed the front of the stroller and another guy grabbed the handle and between the two of us we got it off safe and sound, both kids intact and happy. The other guy shifted to one side so the mother could get off. She paused long enough to retrieve my bag with her foot and pull it back near where I’d been standing. I held my hand to help her down. She nodded her thanks and started to push the stroller down the sidewalk. Just as I reached to haul myself back up into the bus the driver shut the door on my hand. I dropped back to the sidewalk cradling my bruised hand and watched as the bus drove away.

#flashfiction

 

Sisters

My older sister was prettier, of course, with her black hair and shiny eyes, but I was the smarter one. I was always more subtle, sneakier, content to relish the small victories rather than indulge in the large, over-blown hoo-has and celebrations she liked. For instance, that house of hers. Which house? You mean you don’t know? You must have heard about it at some point. Gingerbread. In the middle of nowhere out in the woods. Children found it and killed her for it. If I warned her once, I warned her a thousand times. Don’t be so obvious, I’d say. Don’t let on about what you’re up to. Did she listen? No – and look where it got her. She took after our cousins in Scotland; I mean, good grief, they made an entire song out of it:

“Adder’s fork and blind-worm’s sting,
Lizard’s leg and owlet’s wing,
For a charm of powerful trouble,
Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.”

Catchy – but not very secretive, you know what I’m saying. Alexander the Great, that was some of my best work; people have argued for centuries about him and they still aren’t sure. That’s how it’s supposed to be. Quiet. Discreet. Not all hi-ho-hi-ho and poison apples. It’s harder these days, of course, but if you know what you’re doing no forensics in the world will catch you. A dash of tainted salt left in a restaurant; a bit good mushroom mixed with the bad; a plate of chocolate candy on the counter for co-workers.

Counting Stars

Have ta keep working while we talk, ‘k?  My sister’s comin’ around from the other direction.  We race and I don’t want her to beat me again this time.  My Mom and the twins are prepping for us; she kneads together the ingredients and the twins polish.  Don’t know how she watches those two and gets anything done.  She’s amazing, ya know; she’s the school lunch lady during the week and takes in ironing on the weekend.  Sis and I cut grass and do odd jobs.  Whatever we’re doing, though, we all meet here as soon as real dark sets in.  We’re a family; we pull together. We get by, but it isn’t easy, you know.  What’s that? Why doesn’t my dad help? He was conscripted.  He was a good, hard-worker until they drafted him to fight the Galactic Empire.  He’s home now; sent him home early on account of his injuries.  He got hit by mentality-agents on his first campaign.  All he does is sit with his eyes rolled up toward the sky like he’s countin’ stars.

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Photographer/designer unknown.  I’ve only been able to trace it to various Pinterest sites.  I wrote this based on this image when it was used as a writer’s prompt by writerslife.org  – Vera

Holy Prince

It’s an honor. I can’t believe how lucky I was. They choose 32 others before they even thought of me. Not even 32 – they picked the 33 Sacrifices but somebody refused; I wasn’t told who, but technically that makes me 34. I can’t imagine why anyone would refuse, but they did, and now here I am; talk about being blessed. The old ritual hanged the Chosen by wrists and ankles, but lower is easier for the Sacrifices. Our legs are strong, especially the back two, but they aren’t very long. Between that and dipping our heads to aim, we often missed and ended up gouging off a leg, sometimes both legs, and the Chosen bled-out during the ceremony.  After that happened enough times, they started sitting them directly on the ground. Most of them scream. Some cry. A few fight and run. Not the prince. He crossed his legs and steeled his back as if having 33 horns ran through him was the most natural thing in the world. His face was like stone except once when 17’s horn caught on something inside and wouldn’t go through. The prince’s face paled; blood pulsed from the wound in long spurts as 17 pulled the tusk back out. Warriors grabbed the prince’s arms and held him immobile while 17 impaled him a second time. What an incompetent buffoon — 17 didn’t even make it to the sacred circle before dying. That won’t happened to me. I’m not embarrassing myself like that; uh-uh; no-way. My parents are here somewhere; they promised they would be, but my vision is too blurry to pick out anybody in this crowd. It’s such a huge turnout. Wait, wait, I’m next. Okay. Deep breath. Deep breath. Here goes. For God, the Empire, and Eternity within the Holy Prince!

#FlashFiction
Based on the National Geographic photo that goes with this article: http://bit.ly/2yKnQ8A (Admittedly a flight of fancy)

Transport

 

The hook flew up, down, in and out. 

She watched the white-haired crafter as the bus shuttered and grumbled. Up. Down. Wrap the yarn. In. Out.  She wondered how the woman could focus.  Her own head throbbed. Hip-hop roared from some punk’s headphones.  Two sisters, well, they looked to be sisters, animated a loud conversation with gestures and laughter.  A small child chanted, “Itsy Bitsy Spider went up the water spout” in a shrill singsong. She could barely think and all she had to do with sit there. Yet here was this old woman working away; her hook blurring in a purposeful, methodical rhythm.  Up. Down. Wrap. In. Out.  The bus jolted to a stop as the driver avoided colliding with a light-colored Kia which had suddenly braked.  The driver blared on the horn.  She couldn’t see what difference it would make. Clearly the Kia’s operator was just as trapped as the bus.  Up ahead she spotted billowing smoke swallowing the horizon.  From somewhere behind the all the stopped vehicles, she could hear the whining of a siren and see pulsating lights. The fire department, she guessed, and wondered how they would traverse the traffic jam.

A young couple, possibly students, rose and navigated between commuters to reach the front of the bus. “Would you let us out here, please?” the young woman asked. The driver shook his head. “Not safe.” “All the cars are stopped. We’ll make better time walking,” the young man said more persuasively.  “Nope,” the driver responded.

            The couple shrugged and headed back to their seats.  She thought she heard the young man swearing but couldn’t be sure. His shoulder slammed into the guy with the headphones, knocking him nearly off his feet. “Sorry” he mumbled.

“What the fuck?” the punk said. As he regained his footing, he pushed the young man backwards causing him to fall into his girlfriend who tumbled across the two sisters.

“Hey,” the sisters cried out in unison. “Be careful.”

“What do you think you’re doing,” the young woman shouted.

“Your boyfriend needs to watch where he’s going,” the guy sneered.

The young man swung his right fist at the guy, missing him by only a couple inches. The guy with the headphones grabbed the man’s shirt and slammed him against the fire extinguisher.

She glanced toward the front of the bus.  The driver was watching everything in the rearview mirror.  The old woman continued crocheting: Up. Down. Wrap the yard. In. Out.

“Driver,” she called out. “Can’t you do something?”

Just as he unbuckled his seat belt and climbed out from behind the steering wheel, a loud crunch jolted the bus, sending all the standing passengers to the floor. An SUV hit the rear of the while trying to get out of the way of the fire truck.  The bus, in turn, crushed into the Kia causing the driver to pitch into the metal fire extinguisher case.

“Shit,” several people said at once.

“Fuck,” several other people said at once.

She righted herself, located her belongings and looked around. The punk with the headphones and the angry young man scrambled over passengers to reach the injured driver.  The sisters and the young woman helped people get up from the floor. 

The small child howled.

She stood and made her way to the priority seats where the old woman slouched with her chin against her chest.  The woman looked up at her when she spoke, touched the back of her hand to her bottom lip, and shook her head as if to clear her thoughts.

“I’ve phoned the police,” a voice said from the middle of the bus.

“We’ve got people back here hurt,” another said.

“The driver is unconscious,” the student said.

“Let’s get him onto the floor,” the punk suggested. Together the two stretched him out in the center aisle between the rows of seats. 

The old woman looked around as if she had dropped something, then spying her yarn on the floor, leaned forward to pick it up.

“Here, let me,” she said.  “You stay where you are.  I’ll get it.”

Her boyfriend retrieved it and passed it to her then she gave it to the woman.

A police officer pounded on the front doors of the bus, so the punk with the headphones located the mechanism and opened them for him.

 “Everyone sit tight,” the officer said. “We need everyone to stay on the bus and remain calm until we get things sorted.  EMT’s will be here shortly.”

“As soon as they can make it through all this traffic,” someone said and everyone laughed. Then, satisfied that the danger was past, they exhaled a collective sigh of relief. 

The old woman picked up her yarn, looped in around the fingers of her left hand to maintain the tension and began to crochet again.  Up. Down. Wrap the yarn. In. Out. Up. Down. Wrap the yarn. In. Out.

###

Rush Hour

Not many folks were in the park. Most massed on the sidewalk waiting for the light to cross onto Winter Street – that’s where I was headed myself. I clipped through Boston Common as quickly as I could without actually breaking into a run and getting my Hugh Boss sweaty. Light Gray. Skinny legs. Nice. Behind me was a chubby black girl, maybe 18 or 19; too much make-up and a hoodie. She carried an iced coffee and listened to music on her phone. Ahead of me tottered an old woman who had a battered backpack slung over one shoulder and a plain, metal cane in her right hand. She progressed so cautiously that I wondered why was she even out at eight in the morning, I mean, when the rest of us are trying to get to work. Surely, Granny could run her errands another time. After studying the area as if trying to get her bearings, she turned to swing around Brewer Fountain. I quickened my pace to pass her, and as I did, the cane skidded sideways on a patch of uneven bricks. She plummeted face-first but managed to bend her elbows so that her knees and forearms took the brunt of the fall. When her backpack slid free, a wrapped sandwich tumbled out. She glanced my way with a pleading look on her face. Clearly, she was struggling to get up and needed assistance. Noting that blood trickled from one of her skinned knees, I thought about my new suit. As I hesitated, the girl with the ear buds and lipstick called out, “Are you all right?” Thank God, I thought to myself then darted onto the Tremont Street sidewalk just as the light turned.